17: The Fifth Beatle – Brian Epstein

April 21, 2015

Podcast, Podcasting

Brian
Vivek
In this episode, Robert and Richard discuss the role the Beatles’ manager had in their lives and the effect his 1967 death had on the band’s fate. They also welcome special guest Vivek Tiwary, author of the New York Times best-seller, The Fifth Beatle – soon to be a motion picture. 
Songs include: “You’ve Got To Hide Your Love Away,”  “Baby You’re A Rich Man,” “America” and “Your Mother Should Know.”

 

Be Sociable, Share!

    12 Responses to “17: The Fifth Beatle – Brian Epstein”

    1. Roger Foster Says:

      I loved the alternate take of You’ve Got to Hide Your Love Away starting your show.
      You wondered the source of how this song got associated with Brian Epstein.
      It was in the Beatles Anthology video.

      Reply

      • Us Says:

        That is absolutely correct, Roger – thanks for pointing that out. But I knew that, in my head at least, the association went back further. Having now looked into it, I see that the assertion was first made by bisexual singer/songwriter/activist Tom Robinson, back in the ’80s. He didn’t mean it as a flat out fact; just an opinion. But apparently the public seems pretty uncritically accepting of this, so the connection has stuck.

        But as I said in the show: John Lennon himself never said this, and I’m sure he would’ve at some point, had it been true.

        Reply

        • The Applesauce Project Says:

          Did Nicholas Shaffner make the possible connection in Beatles Forever? Or perhaps Philip Norman in Shout! as you suggested? I seem to remember thinking the song was about Brian as far back as the late ’70s or early ’80s.

          And can you tell I just discovered your podcast and am making my way through them chronologically? 😀

          Reply

        • Roger Foster Says:

          I agree. The first and only time I saw that song associated with Brian was in the Beatles Anthology, and I’ve never heard any of the Beatles comment on the association. I appreciate how the anthology simply presents it without explanation, as though its ‘obvious,’ but it may be a magical coincidence that it applies to Brian in retrospect.

          Reply

    2. Danny Says:

      The Sexual Offences Act 1967 received royal assent on 27 July 1967. So in Brian’s lifetime (just).

      Reply

    3. Jordan Heal Says:

      40 minutes into your show, you mention that the Beatles wanted no association with Robert Stigwood – Mark’s ‘Tune In’ reveals that they’d had a bad experience on a personal visit to promote ‘Love Me Do’ at Stigwoods office that produced ‘Pop Weekly’ magazine. Stigwood said he was too busy to meet them, which was remembered by Paul 10 years later in an interview with Melody Maker.

      Reply

      • Us Says:

        Excellent – thanks Jordan! I knew there was a reason, but couldn’t recall off the top of my head at the time we taped.

        Reply

    4. Paul Tidey Says:

      Top show as usual boys. ‘America’ was interesting but awful & only marginally worse than ‘Rich Man’ which has always been in my bottom 10 tracks. Roll on No.18.

      Reply

    5. Shaun Says:

      another brilliant podcast you are fast becoming my favourite Beatles podcast and am already looking forward to the next one!

      Reply

    6. Billy Shears Says:

      I actually hear “Baby, you’re a rich fag jew” at the end of the song, just before the wow-yeah … but probably because I grew up knowing that and because English is not my first language, but I never took it as an insult, I always considered it as a “Beatle-clue” … just like some of the many voices you can hear in the Sgt.Pepper, it doesn’t matter what they say, it’s just all about spotting them.
      Please, don’t see my comment as an instigation to argue, it’s 100% my opinion.

      Reply

    7. Billy Shears Says:

      I did forget to say something earlier.
      One of the stories behind “Baby, you’re a rich fag jew” is that Epsteind, on behalf of the fabs, used to keep most of their money “safe”, he used to give them just a small part, in terms of cash. If they wanted something (a new house, a new car etc.) they asked him to do the purchase, but lots of that money it was kept almost secret. We all know that brian was a gambler, and we don’t know what he actually doing with the Beatles money behind their backs.
      Possibly paul and John knew/heard about some big losses but didn’t particularly mind, but they couldn’t keep all the anger inside. One of their ways to confide was to sing it indirectly, just like Sexy Saddie for the Maharishi.

      Reply

    8. Chris Says:

      I’m a guy, and sentimentally is not a subject I like to dwell on, but I like how, in this podcast, it is stressed that Brian actually cared about the Beatles as people. Managers see their clients as dollar signs and just smack of pretentious BS, but Brian actually, genuinely believed in their talent.

      Reply

    Leave a Reply